H8691 - Strong's Hebrew Lexicon Number


Related words

H8691

H8819

Hithpael
a) This form primarily expresses a "reflexive" action of Qal or Piel
See for Qal { [H8851]}
See for Piel { [H8840]}

Qal Hithpael
He wore he dressed himself
He washed he washed himself
He fell he flung himself, he fell upon, he attacked
He sold he sold himself, he devoted himself

b) It expresses a reciprocal action.

they saw they looked upon one another
they whispered they whispered one to another

c) Some verbs in Hithpael are translated as a simple action. The
reflexive action is understood.
He prayed, he mourned, he became angry

This form accounts for 1.4% of the verbs parsed.

H8690
Stem -Hithpael See { [H8819]} Mood -Imperative See { [H8810]}
Count-71

H8692
Stem -Hithpael See { [H8819]} Mood -Infinitive See { [H8812]}
Count-116

H8693
Stem -Hithpael See { [H8819]} Mood -Participle See { [H8813]}
Count-139

H8694
Stem -Hithpael See { [H8819]} Mood -Perfect See { [H8816]}
Count-157

H8820
Hithpalel
This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
causative/reflexive in meaning. The separate term occurs because
certain verb forms reduplicate their final consonant and change into
a quadriliteral (4-letter) root rather than the normal triliteral
(3-letter) root form.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8821
Hithpalpel
This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
causative/reflexive in meaning. The separate term occurs because
certain verb forms reduplicate their final syllable (final two root
letters) and change the normal triliteral (3-letter) root form
into a reduplicated two-letter root.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8822
Hithpeil
In Biblical Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is a passive causative/
reflexive conjugation like the Hebrew Hophal. The verb functions
similarly to the Hebrew Hophal, expressing passive causative
action, but with the effect of the action upon oneself, being
reflexive.

See Hophal { [H8825]}
See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8823
Hithpoel
A Hebrew intensive reflexive stem, caused by the lengthening of the
final vowel in the second syllable of the triliteral (3-letter) root.
This form functions similarly to the Hithpael.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8824
Hithpolel
This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
causative/reflexive in meaning. The separate term occurs because
certain verb forms reduplicate their final consonant and change into
a quadriliteral (4-letter) root rather than the normal triliteral
(3-letter) root form. This form additionally lengthens the initial
vowel in the first consonant.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8826
Hothpael
This is a passive form of the Hithpael, indicating a passive
intensive reflexive receiving of action upon the subject. It thus
combines the features of both the Hithpael and the Hophal.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}
See Hophal { [H8825]}

H8827
Ishtaphel
In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
with its form altered due to an initial Aleph and a metathesized
(reversed) Tau and Shin. This form occurs only rarely with verbs
meeting particular spelling qualities.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8828
Ithpael
In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. This form reflects the
intensive causative, and occurs only rarely with verbs meeting
particular spelling qualities.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8829
Ithpeal
In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
reflects only the intensive reflexive of the common stem (Peal =
Hebrew Qal). This form occurs only rarely with verbs meeting
particular spelling qualities.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}
See Qal { [H8851]}

H8830
Ithpeel
In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
reflects only the reflexive of the intensive stem, and functions like
a Hebrew Piel and Hithpael combined.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}
See Piel { [H8840]}

H8831
Ithpeil
In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
reflects only the passive intensive reflexive, and functions like the
Hithpael and Hophal combined.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}
See Hophal { [H8825]}

H8832
Ithpolel
This Aramaic (Chaldean) form is equivalent in use to the Hebrew
Hithpolel, and is causative/reflexive in meaning like the Hithpael.
The separate term occurs because certain verb forms reduplicate their
final consonant and change into a quadriliteral (4-letter) root
rather than the normal triliteral (3-letter) root form. This form
additionally lengthens the initial vowel in the first consonant.

See Hithpael { [H8819]}
See Hithpolel { [H8824]}

H8834
Nithpael
This form is a passive intensive reflexive, combining both the
qualities of the Niphal and Hithpael. Example: Eze 23:48, "that
they may be taught" (= caused to learn).

See Niphal { [H8833]}
See Hithpael { [H8819]}

H8811

Imperfect
The imperfect expresses an action, process or condition which is
incomplete, and it has a wide range of meaning:

1a) It is used to describe a single (as opposed to a repeated) action
in the past; it differs from the perfect in being more vivid and
pictorial. The perfect expresses the "fact", the imperfect adds
colour and movement by suggesting the "process" preliminary to its
completion.
He put forth his hand to the door
it came to a halt
I began to hear

1b) A phrase such as "What seekest thou?", refers not only to the
present, but assumes that the search has continued for some time.

Why do you weep?
Why refuse to eat?
Why are you distressed?

These relate not so much as to one occasion, as to a
continued condition.

2) The kind of progression or imperfection and unfinished condition
of the action may consist in its frequent repetition.

2a) In the present:

it is "said" today
a wise son "maketh glad" his father

2b) In the past:

"and so he did" - regularly, year by year
a mist "used to go up"
the fish which "we used to eat"
the manna "came down" -regularly
He "spoke" -repeatedly

3) The imperfect is used to express the "future", referring not only
to an action which is about to be accomplished but one which has
not yet begun:

3a) This may be a future from the point of view of the real
present; as:

Now "shalt thou See what I will do"
"We will burn" thy house

3b) It may be a future from any other point of view assumed; as:
He took his son that "was to reign"
she stayed to See what "should be done"

4) The usage of 3b may be taken as the transitive to a common use of
the imperfect in which it serves for an expression of those shades
of relation among acts and thoughts for which English prefers the
conditional moods. Such actions are strictly "future" in reference
to the assumed point of relation, and the simple imperfect
sufficiently expresses them; e.g.

of every tree thou "mayest eat"
"could we know"
He "would" say

5a) The imperfect follows particles expressing "transition",
"purpose", "result" and so forth as, "in order that", "lest"; e.g.

say thou art my sister, "that it may be well with thee"
let us deal wisely with the nation, "lest it multiplies"

5b) When however there is a strong feeling of "purpose", or when it
is meant to be strongly marked, then of course the moods are
employed; e.g.

raise me up "that I may requite them"
who will entice Ahab "that he may go up"
what shall we do "that the sea may be calm"

The moods are also employed to express that class of
future actions which we express in the "optative"

"may I die"
"may" the LORD "establish" his word
"may" the child "live".

H8681
Stem -Aphel See { [H8817]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-36

H8686
Stem -Hiphil See { [H8818]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-4043

H8696
Stem -Hithpalel See { [H8820]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-1

H8698
Stem -Hithpalpel See { [H8821]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-12

H8704
Stem -Hithpoel See { [H8823]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-13

H8709
Stem -Hithpolel See { [H8824]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-45

H8714
Stem -Hophal See { [H8825]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-178

H8720
Stem -Ishtaphel See { [H8827]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-3

H8721
Stem -Ithpael See { [H8828]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-14

H8725
Stem -Ithpeal See { [H8829]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-14

H8729
Stem -Ithpeel See { [H8830]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-7

H8731
Stem -Ithpeil See { [H8831]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-5

H8733
Stem -Ithpolel See { [H8832]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-1

H8735
Stem -Niphal See { [H8833]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-1602

H8741
Stem -Pael See { [H8835]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-15

H8746
Stem -Pulpal See { [H8850]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-1

H8748
Stem -Peal See { [H8837]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-145

H8755
Stem -Peel Or Peil See { [H8838]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-3

H8762
Stem -Piel See { [H8840]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-2447

H8766
Stem -Pilel See { [H8841]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-2

H8770
Stem -Pilpel See { [H8842]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-18

H8779
Stem -Poel See { [H8845]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-29

H8783
Stem -Polal See { [H8846]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-2

H8787
Stem -Polel See { [H8847]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-72

H8792
Stem -Pual See { [H8849]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-93

H8799
Stem -Qal See { [H8851]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-19885

H8807
Stem -Tiphel See { [H8853]} Mood -Imperfect See { [H8811]}
Count-1

Reformed Dating